Keeping Watch On The Light Keeper


Happy Tuesday, y’all. I hope this week is being kind to y’all and that you had a good weekend. Our weekend was good. Jeremy and I deep cleaned our house and started interviewing folks for a paranormal team we are putting together. With our frustrations about a reliable paranormal team here in San Diego, we decided put together a team and train them to our standards with the hopes that they will be beneficial to those around San Diego even after we move. So far the interviews seem promising and I’m excited to see what we will do as a team. If you are in the San Diego area (or don’t mind commuting to the area) and want to interview for the team, send me an email. 

This week we are checking out haunted locations in the great state of Michigan. I have never been to Michigan but I know some awesome folks from there, like our friend Abby! (Hi Abby if you’re reading this). Today’s topic was recommended to me by a podcast listener. Read to the end of this post to hear about his own encounter at this location. Thank you, Hunter F. for the recommendation. The Seul Choix Pointe Lighthouse was a really interesting topic to research. 

The Seul Choix Pointe Lighthouse is located in Gulliver, Michigan on the northwest corner of Lake Michigan. It is pronounced Sis-Shwa or Sel-Shwa and is French for Only Choice. The name is do to the fact that it is the only safe spot to pull ashore for 100 miles on Lake Michigan. It is the only active light house on the lake. Built in 1892, the light house features a 79 foot light tower. On the property there are two brick oil houses, a workshop, a barn, a cistern, two lightkeeper’s houses, a boathouse and a dock. The light house has some unique copper moldings around some of the interior doors which is actually pretty unusual for a light house. The light house was automated in 1972. On July 19, 1984 it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places. 

Not only does the light house keep those sailing on the lake safe but it is also home to a couple of ghosts. The most prominent ghost is that of Captain Joseph Willie Townshend. He was the head light keeper in the early 1900s. He died in 1910 of either cancer or consumption (I kept coming across conflicting reports). He was 63 years old when he passed away. Since he died in the middle of winter, his body was preserved in the basement of the light house until the ground thawed enough to bury him which was several months later. Since his death, his spirit has been active through out the property. Visitors and workers associate the smell of cigar smoke with the Capitan since he was always smoking one. His face has been seen peering out of the upstairs bedroom windows of the main light keeper’s home. Some folks have even seen him hiding behind a curtain in one of the bedrooms. He is also known to be seen in the various mirrors through out the main light keeper’s home and the light house. When the staff set the kitchen table, they typically set it the American way, with the knife and spoon on the left side, but when they come back, they’ll find it set the British way and with the tines of the fork facing downwards. The good Captain was born in England and preferred the British way of doing things. In his old bedroom, the bed often has an indent on the edge of the bed as if someone had just sat on the edge of the bed to put on their shoes. A man in a heavy blue coat has been seen walking the property. When people mention him, the staff show a picture of Captain Townshend to the guest who typically says that is who they had just seen walking around. 

The Captain isn’t the only spirit experienced here. Shadow figures have been seen through out the property. Old phonograph music has been heard by several people. In the children’s room, toys get strewn about often. The sounds of little girls giggling has also been heard. It is thought to be the child spirits of two little girls that use to live in the house but grew up and moved on with their lives. The activity in their room didn’t start until they had both passed away from old age. People claim to feel like they are being watched. Electronic devices will stop working for no reason and batteries often drain suddenly. The kitchen chairs will rearrange themselves. 

Speaking of the kitchen, Hunter’s experience happened in the kitchen. He and his mother were visiting the light house. He said he wanted to go because he heard it was one of the scariest places on earth. He said that they didn’t feel afraid there. While exploring the property, his mom walked into the kitchen area briefly. Hunter said that she quickly walked out of the room coughing and her eyes watering. He explained that his mom is very sensitive to cigarette and cigar smoke. She said that it felt like she just walked into the smoke cloud from someone’s cigar. Hunter said that he immediately walked in there to see who would be smoking in the kitchen but not only was there no one in the kitchen but he couldn’t smell any smoke. He said that between his mom walking out of the room and him walking into the kitchen maybe thirty seconds had passed. He said he likes to think it was Captain Townshend. 

If I ever get a chance to go to Michigan, I really hope I can visit Seul Choix Pointe Lighthouse. Even for the history alone it would be interesting to check out but the paranormal aspect is pretty cool too. Thank you so much, Hunter, for suggesting this topic and sharing your experience! If any of y’all would like to suggest a topic or share your paranormal experience, please let me know either in the comments below or send me an email. I’m interested to hear what y’all have to say. 

Don’t forget to check out my podcast! A new episode will be released tomorrow morning. In tomorrow’s episode I talk about an interesting but very haunted museum. I also share a paranormal experience that was shared with Jeremy and I while we were out shopping. If you listen to it, let me know what you think. I always appreciate feedback. 

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