Paranormal Housewife

Who’s A Good Ghost?

Most everyone I meet loves dogs. Dogs are typically loving and faithful, unlike most humans. In fact, when I meet a human that doesn’t like dogs, I make sure I steer clear of those folks as much as possible. I will trust a dog’s judgment of a person or situation over that of a person’s judgment. In fact, when I first started dating my now husband, I told him that when I took him home to meet my dad, he would also have to pass my dog’s approval as well. Thankfully both Dad and Cujo loved him. My ex before Jeremy did not get along with Cujo at all. I should have listened to Cujo and avoided that heartache but at least listening to Cujo lead me to a long, happy relationship with Jeremy.

In Nashville, there is a neighbor by the name of Belmont Hillsboro. The neighborhood is probably the best place to take young children to trick or treating because, in this neighborhood, there is a dog that continues to watch over the young children as they go door to door. This ghost dog is known as Preston. Preston was a boxer that saved the life of a little boy one Halloween night. The boy had dropped some candy as he crossed the street. Not paying attention to the cars, he stopped to pick it. Preston, though, saw the speeding car and leaped out to push the little boy out of the path of the car. Unfortunately, Preston did not survive his heroic act.

For over 50 years, people in that area have since reported that Preston is still there. People who walk too slowly across the street or stop in the middle of the road claim to feel a large dog nudging them on their way. They have also claimed to have been bumped by a dog while walking on the sidewalk but when they turn around there is no dog to be seen. Some people have even reported hearing a dark bark, but no dog is found where the sound came from. The residents make sure that Preston still feels welcomed by leaving dog treats on their doorstep on the evening of Halloween. I’m sure Preston feels the love and knows his protection is appreciated.

A few states away lies another ghostly dog tale about a dog who died protecting his master. In the 1700s, Charles Sims lived in Port Tobacco, Maryland with his blue tick hound. Sims was a soldier who also happened to be quite well off. One evening Sims and his dog went one of the local taverns to have a few drinks. As with most soldiers I know, the drinks caused him to start running his mouth about his wealth and that he had the deed to a property. Depending on some versions of the legend, Sims was either displaying his gold and his deed or he simply talking about it. Also, at the tavern, that evening was a local thug, Henry Hanos, with some of the other people. When Sims and his dog left the tavern, Hanos and his gang followed him. Near Rose Hill Manor, Hanos and his gang jumped Sims and his dog. Sims was clubbed to death with a rock. His dog followed him, shortly, in death. Hanos took Sims’ gold and the deed to his property and buried by a holly tree.

Later on, Hanos attempted to retrieve the stolen gold and deed. When he arrived at the tree, he was surprised to find a large blue glowing dog. The dog howled at Hanos before charging at him. Terrified, Hanos ran away. Hanos meant to come back to get the fortune again but ended up falling ill and dying a short time after the incident. Since then whenever anyone tries to retrieve the fortune at night, there is a good chance that they, too, will see a large glowing blue dog. Locals have reported hearing odd howling from the area at night.

Tales like this make me wish I still had a dog as a pet. Maybe when Jeremy is out of the military and we are in our forever home. Until then, we will be a cat only household. It’s easier to move (especially overseas) with cats and cheaper too.

Be sure to check out my YouTube channel for new videos. I have uploaded a new one that you’ll want to check out if your a fan of Rampu, the haunted lamp. I will be uploading another video this weekend. So be sure to subscribe to my channel in order to know when that drops!

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