Highway Of Blood

Here in America there are some roads that some of the most seasoned drivers get nervous driving down because of how dangerous they are. The ghosts along the side of the road aren’t the only reminders of their bloody past.

“Blood Alley”

Highway 93 stretches across Arizona. It is often called Blood Alley due to the numerous accidents that happen on this highway. It’s dangerous curves helped cause the high number of accidents that help give it the unfortunate prestige of being called the most dangerous highway in the United States. But its not just the curves that have added to the high rate of accidents and deaths on Highway 93. Along the highway there are white crosses marking the places were people have unfortunately died. In one place there is a section with six white crosses. It was here that a family had pulled over due to a flat tire. The father had gotten out of the car to fix the tire while the mother and their four children stayed in the car. While he worked on the tire, a truck came over the hill. The driver of the truck never even saw the car before he hit it, killing the family. Reports about the crash say that the trucker claims he had no idea what he hit until he got out of the truck. Others have reported that the highway looks empty until they are suddenly on top of another vehicle or passing one going in the other direction. Another contributing factors to the many deaths along the road is the fact that there is no cell service along most of the highway. Radios have a hard time getting a signal. EMS also takes 30 minutes or longer to come once they are notified of an accident.

A few different ghost have been reported to be seen along the highway. Often people are seen walking along the highway but no matter how fast the car is traveling, the car never catches up with them. Eventually the people fade from view or disappear over the top of a hill. Also seen occasionally are the ghosts of camels. When the area was first being developed, the military brought camels in to help haul supplies through the desert. The camels’ tolerance to heat and being able to lift large loads while requiring very little water made them ideal for the task. When the military no longer needed the camels, they were released into the desert. While no wild camels have been found, their ghosts have been seen walking through the desert before fading away.

Another spirit that people have reported seeing is very unique. Okay, maybe not as unique as ghost camels wondering the desert, but I digress. People driving at night say that they see what looks like a lantern waving way in the distance. They see it for a while before coming up on it. As they pull up they notice the lantern looks like an old kerosene lantern. Pulling up to the light, people say that holder of the light is a six foot man in cowboy boots, cowboy hat and black pants. Behind him is an older model Harley Davidson motorcycle. When the car stops to see what the man needs, the man steps back away from the light and everything (the lantern, the bike and the man) disappears.

Route 2A

Located on the other side of the country from Blood Alley in Maine, is Route 2A. This highway located in Aroostook County goes through Haynesville Woods. It was originally used to take the potato crops down south to Boston, Massachusetts. The curvy, icy roads prove to be treacherous even to the most skilled truck driver. A former truck driver, Dick Curless even wrote a song about the route called “A Tombstone Every Mile”.

All you big and burely men who roll the trucks along
Better listen you’ll be thankful when you hear my song
You have really got it made if you’re haulin’ goods
Anyplace on earth but those Haynesville Woods
It’s a stretch of road up north in Maine
That’s never ever ever seen a smile
If they’d buried all them truckers lost in them woods
There’d be a tombstone every mile
Count ’em off there’d be a tombstone every mile

When you’re loaded with potatoes and you’re headed down
You’ve got to drive the woods to get to Boston town
When it’s winter up in Maine better check it over twice
That Haynesville road is just a ribbon of ice
It’s a stretch of road up north in Maine…

When you’re talking to a trucker that’s been haulin’ goods
Down that stretch of road in Maine they call the Haynesville Woods
He’ll tell you that dying and going down below
Won’t be half as bad as driving on that road of ice and snow
It’s a stretch of road up north in Maine…

This stretch of road is considered to be the most haunted road in Maine. People report a variety of different ghosts. One of the more common sightings is of a newlywed bride. She is seen walking along side the road. No matter how fast the car is going, nobody is able to catch up with her. She is sometimes seen screaming on the side of the road too but disappears as the car pulls along side her. She is thought to a newly wed bride that was driving down the road with her new husband when they lost control of their car. He died instantly but she was able to get out. She walked along side the road trying to find help but ended up freezing to death before anyone came by.

Some drivers have reported seeing a little girl suddenly appearing in front of their car but disappears again before the car hits her. Back in 1967 an odd set of events happened in this area. On August 22, 1967, a ten year old girl was walking down the highway when she was hit by one of the big trucks going by. That very same day but further up the road, another ten year old girl was hit by another big truck. The ghost is thought to be one of these little girls that were killed that day.

What creepy highways have you been down? Let me know in the comments below.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: